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    Leaking Zone Valve (9 Posts)

  • Ken Ken @ 3:33 PM
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    The stem is probably

    worn - as is the o-ring. Your system water is probably acidic which shortens the life of all components. Best bet might be to drain the system, install a complete new zone valve and while at it, clean the sstem with TSP or system cleaner. Rinse, refill with clean water and bleed all the air out. A new Erie or comparable Honeywell zone valve should be around 75-bucks. Lots of labor involved. This is one of the few areas that a homeowner might tackle if soldering is in your area of expertise. If not, the labor to do it all will be stiff; and rightly so. To Learn More About This Professional, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Professional"
  • Andrew Greif Andrew Greif @ 6:18 AM
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    Leaking Zone Valve

    I have a baseboard heating system and have an Erie control zone valve that looks like it's leaking (a drip every 20 minutes or so) from the stem. On the valve cover it has "5/8IFL MOPD 10PSI". It also has "HOTLINE, Erie MFG CO, Milwaukee, WI" on it. My question is, I'm having trouble finding replacement parts. I'm assuming it's a stem gasket that has broken down? Where can I get that, or does it sound like something else may be causing this problem. Is this something I can do without having to re-sweat a new valve on? Thank you, Getting closer to winter, Andrew in NY.
  • Hvacman Hvacman @ 7:14 PM
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    Flared zone valve

    It's more likely an inverted flare fitting on the valve... I think that's what the "IFL" suffix meant... A snap to replace as long as the run has a little wiggle room... No such thing as replacing the o-ring, it's below the bonnet nut and therefore you have to drain the system anyway.
  • Peter Invision Peter Invision @ 4:52 PM
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    d

    > I have a baseboard heating system and have an
    > Erie control zone valve that looks like it's
    > leaking (a drip every 20 minutes or so) from the
    > stem. On the valve cover it has "5/8IFL MOPD
    > 10PSI". It also has "HOTLINE, Erie MFG CO,
    > Milwaukee, WI" on it. My question is, I'm having
    > trouble finding replacement parts. I'm assuming
    > it's a stem gasket that has broken down? Where
    > can I get that, or does it sound like something
    > else may be causing this problem. Is this
    > something I can do without having to re-sweat a
    > new valve on?
    >
    > Thank you, Getting closer to
    > winter, Andrew in NY.

  • Andrew Greif Andrew Greif @ 4:50 PM
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    Ken, thanks for the reply. My house is from 1973 and I noticed the valves have a 1991 date on them, just a little tid bit there. The other thing I failed to notice before I posted my question is that the valves look to have a compression fitting. Similar to this: www.plumbworld.co.uk/images/pwhv0013l.jpg should be a little less of a task for that, no? there is no way to just get that O-ring, right?
  • Ken Ken @ 5:01 PM
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    If they look like the photo, they are indeed compression. Be certain to be extremely careful when replacing the ZV that you do not nick or compromise any aspect of the compression nut, ferrule or tube. If the ZV was installed by a heavy handed wrench, in all lilihood, the replacement will be a bear to fit in. The existing copper tubing will be crimped severely at the ferrule rest point, so crimped in that removing it will be almost impossible! You are on thin ice leak-wise if you re-use the existing ferrrule, but may have to if it is so crimped into the tubing as to prevent its removal; the nut as well for that matter. I do not believe the Erie ZV body o-ring can be repaired. If however the o-ring is part of the head/operator, you may get lucky and simply have to replace that aspect - not the entire body. With the system pressure at zero and two large pails, you may try to wing it and see how its sealed/made. They switched from bodied seals to operator seals as fast as we change our socks. What you have may be revealed with good light and stronger glasses(;-o) Let us know what you find. You may luck out. To Learn More About This Professional, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Professional"
  • Andrew Greif Andrew Greif @ 9:01 PM
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    Brian, thanks for the info, you might be right. Here is a picture of the valve and of the cover. What's the difference between a flared and a compression fit? I figured either way I would have to drain the system. http://home.nycap.rr.com/agreif/valve.jpg
  • Hvacman Hvacman @ 3:36 PM
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    Yup...

    Yes, inverted flare. This type connection is less likely to leak after you play with it than compression joint, a little pipe dope on the flare and seat before reassembly should insure success. I could have been more clear in my comment re: draining the system: Even if you could get the right o-ring, to replace it requires draining the system and removing the bonnet of the valve... since you will be draining the system, the best course of action is to replace the whole valve with a new one. If this were my home, and how many plumbers would do it is to isolate the feed and expansion tank from the system, relieve the system pressure, swap the valve "on the fly", and catch the leakage into a carefully placed bucket. This method is fast and minimizes fresh water makeup and air getting into the system. Good luck, consult with a local professional if you are unsure of how it's done... it will be much less expensive to have a pro do it than if it were a soldered valve.
  • Hvacman Hvacman @ 7:30 PM
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    Pict of inverted flare

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