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    US shale gas to heat British homes within five years (10 Posts)

  • SWEI SWEI @ 6:16 PM
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    US shale gas to heat British homes within five years

    We knew this was coming http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/mar/25/us-shale-gas-british-homes-five-years

    How many more deals like this will it take to get the wellhead price up to where they want it?
  • BobC BobC @ 7:34 PM
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    Going up

    No question that any meaningful liquification and export of natural gas will not be good for our heating bills. The question is how high will it go.

    Bob
    Smith G8-3 with EZ Gas @76,700 BTU, Single pipe steam


    Vaporstat with a 12oz cut-out and 4oz cut-in


    3PSI gauge
  • heatpro02920 heatpro02920 @ 7:58 PM
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    2X

    maybe 3X if we are really lucky people... Im going to start fabricating a boiler that burns money, at least then maybe we will be able to get some btus out of it..
  • icesailor icesailor @ 8:44 AM
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    Price/Cost

    It will go high enough to equal oil.
    Gas will be slightly less but the profits to the crime syndicate will be higher because they totally control the distribution system. Look at the consolidation of LPG/Propane in the USA. The Mom & Pop fuel companies that deliver both are giving up on heating oil, then being bought up by the national Corporations who only want to sell product and have us service the equipment. Americans always go for the product price and crab about the price to service the equipment.
    "Drill Baby, Drill"!!
    So the product that comes from the USA, ends up on the world market while we subsidize the product. Its the American Way. A few get the goods, the rest of us get the screw and the shaft.
  • Boiler Talk Boiler Talk @ 8:48 PM
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    What if?

    OPINION: All of the savings you see today in your natural gas bill is because of fracking on private land.  Your utility may not transfer the wholesale price savings to you because of state mandates or other controlling bodies.   Gas is so plentiful producers are going after oil instead, until the wholesale price of natural gas again increases.  That is, there is more profit in oil.  Hard to imagine.  Imagine what the market would be like if the feds opened our US federal land for production.   Probably an even greater oversupply.   Nothing the Obama administration has done is driving down the cost.  Remember he plays a part as much as Iran does.  Some of his base want to deny union jobs and industry - Keystone pipeline.  I beg you bare with me here.   I know I will lose some readers, because I diss Obama.  He is human after all.   I don't believe you should be frightened.  Back in the 60's some scientist and then others promoted the idea of Peak Oil.  That new sources of oil would decline, that man or woman, could not wait and needed to convert to wind, solar or nuclear or cold fusion immediately.  Well, we're still waiting for Peak Oil. Right?!  It didn't take government subsidies, which are required for solar and wind or things like mandated purchases, to get the price natural gas down.  Remember mandated ethanol makes you get less gas mileage per gallon - it does support farmers and their political buddies.  I think we also need to look at the historic price of fuel.  How much more expensive is it today than 50 years ago?  The demand for oil and gas is not going to decline anytime soon.  Yet, only those countries and US states that deny exploration or have economic structures that stifle competition are suffering economic malaise.  I believe there is plenty to be hopeful for in the coming days.  Making sense with policy and believing in market "based" solutions.  Yeah, gas and oil companies help you and me, but don't forget geopolitical stability. 
    This post was edited by an admin on March 30, 2013 8:50 PM.
  • SWEI SWEI @ 9:06 PM
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    M. King Hubbert

    Was a geologist who did decades of research work at Shell.  His projections were just about dead-on with regard to US production (a correction for hyperbolic versus parabolic curves eventually created a better fit.)  The mainstream media and the general public continue to ignore the real meaning:  Peak oil signals the end of _cheap_ oil, not the end of oil.  What the industry faces are higher extraction costs, higher risks, and lower ERoEI.

    Despite the temptation, I'm going to stay out of the political argument.  I believe the facts speak for themselves with regard to domestic production of both oil and gas.
    This post was edited by an admin on March 30, 2013 9:11 PM.
  • Paul48 Paul48 @ 9:18 AM
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    Finite Oil Reserves

    The only argument among the scientists, is how long the oil will last. They all agree it will run out.They were arguing 25 to 35 years, long before the rapid modernization in China began. It would seem that those countries that rely on it the least will be in the best position as we approach and pass that threshold.Have you heard the expression " Stupid like a fox"? Why should the U.S. deplete its reserves? Let the middle east, and other areas run themselves out of oil first, and we come out on top.
  • TonyS TonyS @ 11:56 AM
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    Heres the list

    http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=LNG_Terminals

    Dont forget, many countries without pipelines are already liquifying. The Afghan war is not about terrorist but about the TAPI pipeline.
    Of course gas will go up, who knows maybe you will start to see more NG cars and trucks.
    I feel the real answer for any long term fuel is Photovoltaic. The micro inverter systems are plug and play. Build a rack and add one or two a year as money allows. Air to water heat pumps are here and they are as efficient if not more than ductless heat pumps.
    If you live in an older house, start blowing the walls out one by one, reinsulate and drywall, take care of the wiring while your in there.
    Of course gas will go up, what doesnt? But it will take time for all this to happen..
    There will be lots of court cases and permits and payoffs and who knows maybe right around the corner someone will invent that super battery and everything will change again. I like change...keeps things interesting. 
  • SWEI SWEI @ 12:07 PM
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  • TonyS TonyS @ 2:18 PM
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    Grid storage

    that could be a problem. But the batteries Im refering to are quick charge, high storage capacity for cars. That would change the fuel needed for cars....again over time.
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