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    Professional? (18 Posts)

  • Robert O'Brien Robert O'Brien @ 9:10 AM
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    Professional?

    Sure,just look at those pliers!
  • Steamhead Steamhead @ 9:13 AM
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    I can't wait

    for the liability verdicts after one of those HD-sold DIY jobs blows up a house. 
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"

    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists

    Oil & Gas Burner Service

    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
  • Robert O'Brien Robert O'Brien @ 9:16 AM
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    Ad

    This ad is in the current issue of a trade journal
  • Steamhead Steamhead @ 9:18 AM
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    Which one?

    We should cancel our subscriptions.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"

    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists

    Oil & Gas Burner Service

    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
  • Robert O'Brien Robert O'Brien @ 9:27 AM
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    Steamhead

    Why? I learn much more from those I disagree with!
  • RobG RobG @ 12:03 PM
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    Good God!!

    He's got one set of slip joint pliers and some kind of channel lock and it appears that he is loosening the fitting or he doesn't know which direction channel locks operate. Obviously this actor was "certified" by the Home Depot training crew.
    And why would someone use a chrome manifold?
    Rob
    This post was edited by an admin on June 27, 2013 12:05 PM.
  • Jean-David Beyer Jean-David Beyer @ 1:45 PM
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    why would someone use a chrome manifold?

    The chrome plated manifold explains everything!

    That is a manifold for a hot water distribution system.
    So there will be no problem with gas leaks, no matter how incompetent this guy is.
    Water leaks, maybe, especially when the CSST reacts badly to the propylene glycol after the inhibitors wear out. I bet that until it fails, the CSST will not pass oxygen into the system though. But does it not cost more than Pex-Al-Pex? And it is probably larger diameter than it needs to be, considering how small the mainfold is.

    On the other hand, if he needs such large CSST pipes, the manifold is too small.
  • Charlie from wmass Charlie from wmass @ 3:37 PM
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    I am so glad for the wall

    I saw that add and really felt it was a mess. even the pliers are being used backwards. What happened to using flat jaw wrenches?
    Cost is what you spend , value is what you get.

    cell # 413-841-6726
  • icesailor icesailor @ 5:30 PM
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    Connections:

    That's an immaculate connection. No thread sealer on the nipple threads or the black plug on the end.
    At least two wrenches are being used. He's just getting warmed up for the twisting. He'll figure out that he has it wrong. Me personally, being extremely dyslexic, I put pipe wrenches on wrong all the time. Especially when I am on my back in a crawl space and there's no room for leverage or wrenches.
  • bob bob @ 6:20 PM
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    perfeshinal

    I'm a perfeshinal and you can be too. You jist gotta go to dis website and klik .

    http://register.alphaflexgas.com/
    bob
  • Gordo Gordo @ 12:35 AM
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    My Take Is

    This ad was put into several trade journals for professionals to look at.  They could have put a bit more effort into showing their product being installed correctly.  It undermines any claim to a quality product in my view.  It is being sold to "Bubba Buttcrack". Period.

    I went onto their web site and got instantly "approved" to install this *stuff* by clicking on to, in effect,  crossmyheartI'vereadthemanualandI'llbeagoodboyandinstallitcorrectly.

    Oh goody.

    Most places like Hone Desperate have lawyers on retainer that one does not call, but pentagrams are drawn on the floor to summon them.  The (we hope) few homeowners that may be injured by this product and move forward with claims will be ground to dust by such as them.

    The calculations are done very carefully:

    X number of feet of product and x number of fittings sold equals x gross profit.

    Expected % product installed incorrectly (we will claim not our fault anyway- it was Bubba), or struck by lightning (again, claim 'not our fault - act of G-d. So there').

    What? Bubba wasn't licensed?  You hired him, not us.  How is that our problem?
    This CSST is an approved product that is legal to sell.  You didn't have to buy it.

    Of that, the fraction of % resulting in damage, injury or death.

    Of that fraction of a fraction of % resulting in claims against us.

    Of that fraction of a fraction of a fraction of %, claims we can buy off at below cost of trial.

    And The foolish remaining few who insist on getting their "rights" in court?
    "These will deal our justice out: Sell. Deny. Delay."    Dust.

    Perhaps buy insurance to cover expected claims?   Subragate any insurance Bubba might have?

    Result: net profit.

    It is sort of what Ford did when they calculated it was cheaper to pay off claims of injury and death of folks who drove Pintos than to fix the problem of the gas tanks.
  • LPGasman LPGasman @ 6:10 AM
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    CSST is only as good as the installer

    I have had to repair a ton of CSST leaks over the years and 100% of those were caused by the installer, usually the end of the tube looks like it was hack sawed off. For the time you save over cutting and threading black pipe you should take your time cutting the CSST. A few tips for nice clean cuts are cut the piece off the roll a few inches longer than needed then size it and do a final cut it makes a much smoother end cut. If using Trac Pipe™ I like to make sure the fitting hub goes smoothly inside the CSST then tighten to specs. Also If you are running CSST to a Tankless a 60' run of 1/2" probably not going to cut it. Almost nobody knows about bonding this stuff either.
  • MikeL MikeL @ 7:13 AM
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    other trades................

    I've been on enough csst repair calls to convince me not to use it, and thankfully, I don't need the work. I'lll stick to black iron pipe; the potential for catastrophic failure is reduced exponentially - handymen, diyers, GCs, knowitalls, and others with various levels of building skills, are far less likely to attempt to alter, adjust, repair, add to, subtract from an iron pipe installation. .....................
  • Plumdog Plumdog @ 8:50 AM
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    I guess things change over time...

    When I went for certification about ten-fifteen years ago, one of the product reps ASSURED us that these products would NEVER be sold retail at the big box stores. I thought it sounded like a lie at the time, so I noted it in my mental file. I don't use it myself, but the company I work for uses it all the time. The younger guys won't thread pipe unless somebody insists on it. It cuts into extended break time to much.
  • Mark Eatherton Mark Eatherton @ 9:29 AM
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    Certification?

    Did you actually receive your certification?

    I took the class, ate the cold pizza, drank the flat soda and NEVER did receive my "card", but have never been carded by any wholesalers when purchasing it.

    When I asked the rep about it, he assured me that it was in the works. I am still waiting...

    I think there are some serious holes in more than just their tubing...

    Saw it for sale in a big box store. Not sure how they are handling certification at that level...
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
  • Rich Rich @ 8:05 AM
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    Mark

         Self certification which depends on the cashier doing their job and not allowing you to purchase without having the book at register . Really good practice huh ?
         I use black pipe as a rule but occasionally run across the situation where CSST is pretty much a must use . in those instances I require proper bonding be performed by the electrician . I have never understood the hubbub about CSST causing problems during lightning strikes anyway .  The IFGC has always had a provision for above ground gas piping .  Sections 309 - 310 .  
    You didn't get what you didn't pay for and it will never be what you thought it would
  • Plumdog Plumdog @ 8:52 AM
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    Well yes I did!

    There was a certification spectacular at Red Rocks, where four or five Reps conducted simultaneous but separate classes. There was an introduction by one of the State Inspectors, we had the Pizza and Soda, then we learned all about the need and requirement for those ultra-expensive nail guards and bend supports and termination parts. At the end, a quick exam was administered in each area, and a Certification handed over (except one brand, they were going to mail it but never did). I still have the cards, but only used one of them one time. I think three of those companies have disappeared or changed names or merged.
    The theme was promotion of labor cost savings. A quick calculation showed me the materials costs negated any labor savings, and in view of the flimsy appearance of the tube and connectors, I decided to not use it. I fix it sometimes, though. Had one last summer where some type of electrical ground fault sizzled a hole in the CSST. Scared hell out of the occupants when their basement filled up with LP gas. 
  • Timco Timco @ 9:13 AM
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    HD ads

    Remember a few years back when someone posted the ad of the guy installing a water heater and was using a map gas torch pointed right at one of the flexible connectors, and the WH was on a flimsy wood platform.

    I believe the winning comment was that they could not get it to light so the torch was their only option to get the customer hot water.
    Working on steam and hot-water systems isn't rocket science....it's actually much harder.
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