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    New Install - Oil Smell / Dirty Water (44 Posts)

  • ESteam ESteam @ 9:07 PM
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    New Install - Oil Smell / Dirty Water

    As they say, long time listener, first time caller.

    We converted to gas, new boiler (Burnham KIN6LNI-LE2 ) and hot water heater were installed. We are mostly steam with one hot water zone for master bedroom.

    We fired up the heat and there is definite oil smell throughout the house. I also noticed that the water seems dirty. When it was installed, the water was a bright green, not sure what additive was added. Also, when the system was installed i asked about a skim port. They said it wasn't possible since that's where the hot water zone is fed from. It does look like there is a place to drain near that connection, but not sure if skimming from there is possible.

    Pictures attached. Any help is appreciated. And yes, the steam books are on their way.
  • JStar JStar @ 9:18 PM
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    Steam

    The boiler absolutely needs to be skimmed. Draining it alone will not remove the oils. There should be a skim tap behind the right side jacket near the height of the relief valve.

    Also, the circulator for the boiler side of the hot-water zone needs to be a bronze dry-rotor pump, and preferably a large impeller type like a B&G 100. The wet-rotor TACO pump will rot out and fail within the first year or two.
    - Joe Starosielec
    732-494-4357
    j.star@thatcherhvac.com
    http://thatcherhvac
    http://facebook.com/thatcherhvac


    Guaranteed performance. Guaranteed energy savings.

    Serving all of NJ, NYC, Southern NY State, and eastern PA.
    Consultation anywhere.
    (Formerly "ecuacool")
    This post was edited by an admin on November 5, 2013 9:20 PM.
  • ESteam ESteam @ 9:31 PM
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    Steam

    ok, not sure exactly what you're asking. Still new to this stuff and i don't have the lingo down.

    Here is a closer up picture of what i think is the relief valve on the right side. Can i use that to skim?

    There is a tank near the hot water setup. Picture attached. What should be done here? I had both the steam and hot water zone on today and there was a loud noise coming from the lower right of the hot water setup.
  • JStar JStar @ 9:34 PM
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    Boiler

    Look directly to the left of the relief valve. There is a stamped opening in the boiler case. Behind there should be a skim tapping.

    The noise is most likely due to the lack of a tempering bypass on the pumped loop. Is it hammering or just scraping?
    - Joe Starosielec
    732-494-4357
    j.star@thatcherhvac.com
    http://thatcherhvac
    http://facebook.com/thatcherhvac


    Guaranteed performance. Guaranteed energy savings.

    Serving all of NJ, NYC, Southern NY State, and eastern PA.
    Consultation anywhere.
    (Formerly "ecuacool")
  • ESteam ESteam @ 9:45 PM
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    Steam

    Ok. I see the stamped part of the boiler a little under the height of the relief valve and about towards the middle of the boiler. Should i have the installer come back to install a valve for skimming? Is installation of the skim port considered part of the standard install?

    Do you think the smell is the result of the dirty water or a coincidence?

    The noise was very loud. Sounded almost like an alarm going off. Should the ciculator pump be left as is even though you indicate it will fail in a year or two? I didn't know enough to specify a particular kind in the contract so i doubt they will replace it.
  • JStar JStar @ 9:52 PM
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    Boiler

    Installing a skim port and skimming SHOULD be a part of every job. Several skimmings may be needed in order to remove all of the oil. A clean boiler will operate much more efficiently. We witness the oil smell issue a few times. It is directly related to oil in the boiler.

    The circulator loop needs to be addressed.

    http://www.heatinghelp.com/article/330/Condensate-Hot-Water-Heating/76/Condensate-Hot-Water-Heating-FAQ

    Read through this for a better explanation.
    - Joe Starosielec
    732-494-4357
    j.star@thatcherhvac.com
    http://thatcherhvac
    http://facebook.com/thatcherhvac


    Guaranteed performance. Guaranteed energy savings.

    Serving all of NJ, NYC, Southern NY State, and eastern PA.
    Consultation anywhere.
    (Formerly "ecuacool")
  • N/A @ 11:28 PM

    why??

    Why flat plate exchanger used here?? Show some pictures of above the boiler, inquiry minds want to know how's its piped..
  • ESteam ESteam @ 9:43 AM
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    Steam

    Always happy to post more pics.

    As an fyi, the previous oil install did not have anything mounted to the wall.
  • MDNLansing MDNLansing @ 10:55 AM
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    Is that a fire sprinkler?

    Is that a standard heat initiated fire sprinkler above the boiler? I'm by no means any kind of steam expert, but I am interested in knowing the opinion of the professionals on this board about that. Wouldn't there be a greater chance that sprinkler head fails, than the chance it does any good? I always thought the red fused heads blew around 160 degrees, but as low as 135 (I'm a computer nerd that's built several data centers and dealt with these things failing). A natural gas fueled fire near that boiler isn't going to extinguish with that thing. Wouldn't it be safer to have an ion detector that relayed a gas shut off and sounded the house alarms? And if it's a building code that requires that thing, all I will do is shake my head and be quiet because I've been there and done that too.

    For the skimming, not sure how handy you are, but I am able to skim my boiler and I'm just a homeowner. If you do have a pro come install that valve it should be a piece of cake for you. I don't have a skim port on my old boiler, but I am able to insert a nipple into the low water cut housing and skim from that. Works quite well for my system. Just take your time and be very, very patient and slow.

    Good luck!
  • ESteam ESteam @ 11:19 AM
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    Yep

    First off. I happen to be a geek as well, currently building out a new cage.

    Yes, standard heat fire sprinkler. Not sure if code requires it. Seemed like most of the quotes i got for the boiler install included it. Thoughts from others whether this is necessary or even a good idea?

    Interesting. Well, hopefully i can get the valve installed. But good to know there are options.
  • N/A @ 1:51 PM

    not able

    Not able to find the correct Burham boiler manual on line.. I'm a Weil McLain boiler guy... matched up to your Burnham boiler specs... looks like riser is too small, shud be 2.5 or bigger. Hopefully, the installer left the manual on the site and you can confirm the piping size.
  • ESteam ESteam @ 7:19 PM
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    Manual

    I have the manual here. I took a picture, not sure if you'll be able to read the page. For this model, it looks like 2in is the minimum.

    I suppose the minimum is what was done all around.
  • MDNLansing MDNLansing @ 9:48 PM
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    Single Tap

    Is that manual used to cover multiple sizes of the same model boiler? If your boiler only has one steam pipe, the answer is obvious. However, if that manual diagram applies to your specific boiler, why did he only tap one steam pipe out of the unit instead of using the two shown in the book?
  • N/A @ 10:31 PM

    the last poster

    The last poster got a point there, not having the updated Burnham manual.. does looks like the boiler is asking for two risers...
  • MDNLansing MDNLansing @ 12:52 AM
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    According to....

    the installation manual, the second riser is "optional" for 3 - 6 sections and required for 7 to 12 sections. How many sections is your unit?

    It also states there is a "factory plugged surface blow off" port to the left of the pressure safety relief valve. Labeled L on page six of the installation manual. It's a 1" pipe. Page 59 of the install manual has clear instructions on cleaning the system. This is all under item "M" in the installation manual and I would contest that if the manual contains the steps, it should certainly be included in the installation. Did he clean the system as stated in the manual, or did he just do his own thing? If he followed those steps properly, there shouldn't be enough residual oil in the system to matter, certainly not enough to smell after a few days.

    Remember, the oil smell coming from the system is the new boiler and piping itself. If the smell is more ambient to the house it might be something related to the old boiler removal or it's process. Like spilling oil out of the old tank or from the feeder line. You should be able to tell the difference between the fuel oil you used before, and residual oil in your new boiler from the manufacturing process. Is the smell more like fuel oil, or more generic like a just a petroleum smell? Did they drain and remove the old tank, or is it still in the house?

    Either way, if he didn't clean the system per the manufacturers recommendations, I would address that with him right away. You don't want a new system full of oil, tap shavings and little metal bits and slivers.

    Again, I'm a homeowner, not a pipe fitter or steam expert, but I know that things's gotta be as clean as possible to run it's best.

    Install Manual
    http://www.alpinehomeair.com/_viewresource.cfm?ID=663
  • ChrisJ ChrisJ @ 10:01 AM
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    Just a guess

    To me that looks like an IN6 and if so it is piped per minimum requirements. Personally I would have done two 2" risers into a 3" header but that is overkill according to Burnham.
    Weil-McLain EG-45 connected to 392sqft of radiation via two 2" risers into a 3" drop header and 2" equalizer. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment

    Steam system pictures updated 6/5/14.
    https://picasaweb.google.com/thetube0a3/Boiler?authkey=Gv1sRgCImUxIqv9436MQ#
    This post was edited by an admin on November 7, 2013 10:01 AM.
  • ESteam ESteam @ 7:50 AM
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    Steam

    Correct. For the size of this boiler, 2 risers are "optional" . Who knows what is optimal...

    The oil smell is definitely related to the heat as it is only present when the heat is on. I am trying to get the plumbers in to clean it. For now, i'll assume that the cleaning will resolve the odor. Will it damage the system if it takes them a week or more to get in here? They are a bit unresponsive.

    Did anyone else have feedback on the circulators and the hot water zone? Are those Taco pumps really that bad? In the other forums, it looks like they are recommended by several people.
  • ChrisJ ChrisJ @ 10:06 AM
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    Smell

    Esteam, I'm a homeowner and by no means a pro.
    That said I think skimming and a good cleaning will get rid of the smell. Some of the smell may also be cooking off of the boiler it self and flue pipe.

    I have never done anything with a hot water loop so I don't know how dirty water will effect that. However as far as the boiler and steam system are concerned I doubt there will be a problem waiting a little longer for cleaning.

    One trick I've tried to do with little success is using the top of the gauge glass to skim. You close the bottom valve and leave the top open with the boiler OFF. Then open the drain on the gauge glass and slowly fill the boiler until it trickles down through the gauge glass as slow as possible.

    Like I said, I've tried it but had little luck but it may be far better than nothing.


    EDIT : I just noticed the water level in your gauge glass. Not sure if anyone else mentioned it but on this model you should have it around 3/4 full when cool.
    Weil-McLain EG-45 connected to 392sqft of radiation via two 2" risers into a 3" drop header and 2" equalizer. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment

    Steam system pictures updated 6/5/14.
    https://picasaweb.google.com/thetube0a3/Boiler?authkey=Gv1sRgCImUxIqv9436MQ#
    This post was edited by an admin on November 7, 2013 10:11 AM.
  • JStar JStar @ 7:49 PM
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    Pumps

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with the pumps. They are just not the correct pump for this application.
    - Joe Starosielec
    732-494-4357
    j.star@thatcherhvac.com
    http://thatcherhvac
    http://facebook.com/thatcherhvac


    Guaranteed performance. Guaranteed energy savings.

    Serving all of NJ, NYC, Southern NY State, and eastern PA.
    Consultation anywhere.
    (Formerly "ecuacool")
  • SWEI SWEI @ 12:19 PM
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    Taco

    offers the 110 in bronze, just for the record.
  • nicholas bonham-carter nicholas bonham-carter @ 10:06 AM
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    DIY skimming

    If they can install the required skimming valve, then you can skim it yourself, as it does take time.--NBC
  • MDNLansing MDNLansing @ 10:18 PM
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    If I recall

    it took me about 4 hours to skim my system (after about 3 hours of cleaning). If the skim port wasn't in the deal and you don't feel comfortable installing it yourself, just have the plumber install it. Install only, not the skimming itself. Have him put it in, then read previous, or post a new, thread here on how to do it.

    The pros on this site are excellent for helping. Not only is it free, but you will learn a tremendous amount. Besides, you don't want to pay a steam guy his rate to sit and watch water trickle out of your boiler like a grandpa with a bladder infection passing a kidney stone. It could rake a very long time (and multiple times) to do it right. Far too expensive to pay him for that part.
  • ESteam ESteam @ 8:17 AM
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    Update

    They are coming today to investigate the smell, hopefully i can convince or pay them to install a port for easy skimming.

    JStar - One of the pumps does make a loud high noise when both zones are on (not constant, noise will start after some time) then go away then come back later. So i'm really curious why these pumps are the wrong ones for this application. Or, what else might be happening to cause the noise. They will be investigating the noise as well while they are here.
  • Rod Rod @ 1:26 PM
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    Steam Boiler Water Circulating Pump

    Hi- Taco pumps are very good pumps! They are used as circulating pumps in hot water systems.
    Wet rotor pumps rely on the liquid  they are pumping for both cooling and lubrication. The majority of the parts in a wet rotor pump are plastic.
    They just aren’t suitable for circulating boiler water from a steam boiler.  Why? Because the water temperature is much higher than they are designed for and the liquid they are pumping is boiler water that contains particulate matter (rust and dirt) that is detrimental to lubricating the pump. (Sort of like having sand in the oil of your car engine) There is also the problem of cavitation. Cavitation results from tiny bubbles of steam being in the liquid pumped (this is especially so if you don’t have a bypass to lower the temperature of the liquid entering the pump) In some cases, cavitation can even eat up a bronze rotor so you can just imagine what it does to plastic!  
    A dry rotor pump has a seal and a self lubricated bearing and the motor, rather than rely on the liquid for cooling, is air cooled. The pump itself is bronze rather than plastic.
    Attached below is a picture of a bronze pump for circulating boiler water to a HW tank. This installation was done by Steamhead & Gordo, who are expert steam pros in Baltimore area.

    On the HW side of your system the Taco pumps will work fine ,however, on the Boiler Water side you need to use a bronze pump.
    - Rod
  • ESteam ESteam @ 5:29 PM
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    Update to Update

    Rod, Thanks for all the info. It's good to know the "why".

    FYI, dealing with a company compared to a single plumber so the guy today is not the same guy who did the install.

    Update is that he flushed / drained the boiler. He didn't know what a skim port was so that path was clearly a non starter.

    They will replace the Taco pump that is making crazy noises. It is on the boiler side of things so coincidence that it needs to be replaced? From Rod and JSteam, perhaps not. We'll see how long the new one lasts, hopefully longer than the week this one did.
  • ChrisJ ChrisJ @ 5:33 PM
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    Bad news

    If the boiler was not skimmed the problem will persist. You're trying to remove an oil film with nothing more than water so when you drain the boiler the film simply lays on the walls of the boiler. When you refill, it comes back. It must be skimmed off of the top of the water.

    The skim port must be installed as per manufactures instructions and I really don't know an easy way to get the company that installed it to do that I'm afraid.

    Perhaps some of the pros on the forum will have some ideas of how to get that done.
    Weil-McLain EG-45 connected to 392sqft of radiation via two 2" risers into a 3" drop header and 2" equalizer. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment

    Steam system pictures updated 6/5/14.
    https://picasaweb.google.com/thetube0a3/Boiler?authkey=Gv1sRgCImUxIqv9436MQ#
  • MDNLansing MDNLansing @ 7:06 PM
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    How handy are you?

    Based on your installation manual, I don't think installing a skim port would be all that hard. Are you comfortable using tools and building things? Posters on here can walk you though installing and skimming if you have the confidence to try.
  • ESteam ESteam @ 8:37 AM
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    Skim Port

    I don't have any issues hiring a pro. I'm sure a pro can knock it out in 20min and i would need a few hours and a few trips to the plumbing supply store.

    Any thoughts on the going rate for something like this? Rough estimate.
  • nicholas bonham-carter nicholas bonham-carter @ 8:57 AM
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    DIY skimming

    We can't talk prices here, but you will be better served to install the skimming valve yourself, as the pro's are no doubt very busy now, and you would probably like an early solution to this problem.
    If you have a floor drain, it would be more convenient to connect a hose which can discharge straight into it.
    Spending time doing simple jobs on your boiler is always beneficial, as it enables you to become more familiar with the boiler, and it's piping.--NBC
  • ESteam ESteam @ 9:43 AM
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    Skim Port

    Can you point me towards instructions for installing the port? I have plenty of instructions for skimming.

    Thanks
  • MDNLansing MDNLansing @ 10:40 AM
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    My Approach

    Start with the obvious safety stuff. Shut off the power, have a bucket or two ready, gloves, etc...

    Earlier in this thread it was pointed out where the skim port was. Left of the pressure relief valve behind the punch out stamped in the boiler jacket. The best thing to do is to remove the boiler jacket at this point if it's feasible. You can do this without taking it off, but if it's just a panel and easy to remove I would remove it. There will be insulation between the boiler and the jacket and you really don't want to get that wet while you're working. Just make sure your finished product allows you to slide the panel back on.

    Remove the sheet metal from the jacket. You'll see a punched hole with a few spot welds on it holding it in place. Pry one edge of the punch out with a screwdriver (gently as to not bend the metal around it). Start working it back and forth with some pliers, and up and down until the spot welds break and the stamped piece comes off.

    Measure to see how high your water line is off the floor. Then measure to see how high this plug is. You might need to drain a little water before removing the plug. Personally, I'd do my weekly blow down first, then work on the skim port, that would ensure you're water level is low enough.

    Once you know you're not getting wet, take the plug out. The plug could be any of several types, hex head, square head, recessed square head. I guess there are several way to do this. Start by getting a socket that fits the head. You might get lucky and have a socket already that fits it, or you might need to buy one. If the plug has a square recessed hole and you can't find a socket for it, try an auto parts store. Break calipers use plugs like this and the usually have large sockets with a piece of square steel sticking out of the end that will slide right into the hole. Many sockets work on multiple heads, just make sure it includes what type of head you need. If you need to buy one, make sure it's impact ready (black not chrome). You have a new boiler so it shouldn't be all that hard to extract the plug. Just use the socket and wrench and try. No go? Add an extension to the wrench and try again. Extension bar should be more than enough force. Just don't over do it and break anything. It's not a race, take your time. If you do have trouble, you could try penetrating oil and TAPPING the socket with a hammer lightly while turning the wrench. Like the effect of a light duty impact wrench. Or, if you have one, a good impact wrench would work too though that would be last resort and make sure your tough settings are adjusted on the impact. You don't want to break the boiler section by using too much force.

    Once the plugs out, its up to you to find the best way to plumb it. Most basically, a nipple then a valve then another nipple. Just make sure whatever you use allows you to pull the boiler jacket / panel on and off. You might need to locate a union between the boiler and the valve so you can easily remove the skim port to get the jacket on and off. It all just depends on sizes of holes and clearances. Using a 1/4 turn ball valve will give you a low profile valve and handle that will probably slide through the panel opening when you go to put it back on. As mentioned, you can pipe down to an existing floor drain, to make it real easy. just make sure you end the pipe just short of the drain so you can see the water flowing and get a small can or bucket under it. When I skim, I run the water for awhile, then collect some in a can to let it settle. After 5 mins or so the oil will separate and float to the top and I know I need to keep going. No oil, then I'm done. At the end of skimming the water might look clean coming out, but collecting some will reveal there is still oil in there.

    That's pretty much it. Take the plug out, pipe it, put the boiler panel back on. Using a valve setup like this lets you skim anytime you want and without removing the panel or jacket again. You'll be amazed how much better your boiler will run with clean water in it,
  • Mark N Mark N @ 9:51 AM
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    Skim

    This is not optimal but it can be done. Remove elbow that has the pigtail and pressuretrol on it and skim from there. Just add water real slow. This will be easier than trying to get the plug out of the block and installing a skim port.
  • Rod Rod @ 1:27 PM
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    Independence Skim Port

    Hi- I put together a PDF which might be of help to you.  Make sure you shut off the boiler/burner and let it cool before opening the skim port.
    - Rod
  • MDNLansing MDNLansing @ 4:49 PM
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    Nice Work Rod

    After looking back at you installation manual, don;t worry about removing the jacket or panel. And you don't need to worry about the valve handle obstructing it's removal. To take it off you would need to remove other things as well. It's not a panel that just slips on and off so the skim port wouldn't be the only thing preventing it from coming off anyway.

    I'd follow Rod's document. He's done a great job with it..
  • N/A @ 4:56 PM

    play it safe..

    Get a real steam pro to install the skim set up for you as well he can check the rest of the system. If u crack the section while taking the factory installed plug out.. u have no one to blame but the few here..
  • ChrisJ ChrisJ @ 5:11 PM
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    Amazing

    As always Rod a beautiful instructional document put together.
    I always love your diagrams!

    Esteam being the boiler was just installed you should have no problem getting that plug out.  If it was mine I would be doing it my self.  However do keep in mind if anything  does go wrong it will be entirely your problem and things can go wrong.  Please proceed with caution.
    Weil-McLain EG-45 connected to 392sqft of radiation via two 2" risers into a 3" drop header and 2" equalizer. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment

    Steam system pictures updated 6/5/14.
    https://picasaweb.google.com/thetube0a3/Boiler?authkey=Gv1sRgCImUxIqv9436MQ#
    This post was edited by an admin on November 9, 2013 5:20 PM.
  • ChrisJ ChrisJ @ 5:27 PM
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    video

    I'm not sure if the website will allow me to upload this video, but this will give the general idea of how to skim.  I did this 6 times to get most of the oil out and it took many hours over a period of many months. 

    This video is probably about the fastest you should skim, slower is better.  A few times I set it to a very slow trickle and went and took a nap.

    The video should play fine with a fairly recent version of windows media player.

    And, the attachment didn't work.  Maybe this link will work?
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10150591529896253&l=629707585283452060
    Weil-McLain EG-45 connected to 392sqft of radiation via two 2" risers into a 3" drop header and 2" equalizer. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment

    Steam system pictures updated 6/5/14.
    https://picasaweb.google.com/thetube0a3/Boiler?authkey=Gv1sRgCImUxIqv9436MQ#
    This post was edited by an admin on November 9, 2013 5:28 PM.
  • Rod Rod @ 7:21 PM
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    Skimming Video

    Thanks guys! 
    Chris- Great Video!  It shows people how easy skimming actually is and that they can do it themselves.  My  first thought was: " Wow! I've been skimming too slowly! :)  
    - Rod
  • MDNLansing MDNLansing @ 7:32 PM
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    hrmmm

    That is much faster than I have done on mine
  • ChrisJ ChrisJ @ 7:40 PM
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    Cmon

    Guys, I said it was as fast as you want to go. :)

    A few times I really did set a slow speed and went and took a nap. Honestly I don't know if slower helped any. In the end I ditched it for the wand anyway.
    Weil-McLain EG-45 connected to 392sqft of radiation via two 2" risers into a 3" drop header and 2" equalizer. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment

    Steam system pictures updated 6/5/14.
    https://picasaweb.google.com/thetube0a3/Boiler?authkey=Gv1sRgCImUxIqv9436MQ#
  • MDNLansing MDNLansing @ 9:59 PM
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    Not you, me

    I wasn't remarking on you running the water too fast, I was remarking on me running it to slow in the past. Thinking of all the hours I wasted sitting in a lawn chair drinking beer with my neighbor while we watched the water trickle out. listening to our wives bitching in the living room, me saying "Honey, this is an old system. You have to be gentle and keep an eye on things. I can't just turn the water on and walk away. Since your at the top of the stairs anyway, would you mind tossing down a few more beers?"
  • JStar JStar @ 11:08 PM
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    Skimming

    Here's a method that I've had very good success with. Skimming takes a long time, and we don't always have that time after a job (late nights).

    With cold water only, I'll do a very slow skim, taking about 2 gallons off.
    Then I'll get the bucket ready, and open the water feed 100%, filling a 5 gallon bucket in about 5 seconds. Do this about 4 or 5 times.
    Another slow cold skim.
    A hot water skim.
    Then enough of the super fast skims until the hot water turns cold.
    One last hot skim if needed.

    This also seems to work incredibly well in cleaning the whole boiler. The fast skim does a good job of getting some of the stubborn gunk out of the boiler. Not conventional, but it works.
    - Joe Starosielec
    732-494-4357
    j.star@thatcherhvac.com
    http://thatcherhvac
    http://facebook.com/thatcherhvac


    Guaranteed performance. Guaranteed energy savings.

    Serving all of NJ, NYC, Southern NY State, and eastern PA.
    Consultation anywhere.
    (Formerly "ecuacool")
  • ESteam ESteam @ 10:07 AM
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    Thanks!

    That pdf is awesome. It is just what i needed.

    Thanks again to everyone who provided help.

    If anyone has any recommendations for steam pros in Nassau (north shore, just outside NYC), let me know. I could obviously use one.
  • ChrisJ ChrisJ @ 10:08 AM
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    Jstar!

    If Jstar travels that far and I suspect he may, then I would highly recommend him.
    Weil-McLain EG-45 connected to 392sqft of radiation via two 2" risers into a 3" drop header and 2" equalizer. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment

    Steam system pictures updated 6/5/14.
    https://picasaweb.google.com/thetube0a3/Boiler?authkey=Gv1sRgCImUxIqv9436MQ#
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