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Steamhead

Steamhead

Joined on March 11, 2004

Last Post on August 21, 2014

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No, replace the elbow itself

@ April 29, 2003 8:36 PM in Radiator Traps

with a tee. You'd end up with a horizontal opening in which you could screw in a short nipple and an elbow pointing up for the vent. This way you don't have to redo any of the existing pipes. Why am I not surprised the hottest radiator in the house is closest to the boiler? This will change quickly when you add the vent! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Limited Wall Space

@ April 29, 2003 9:27 AM in Heat exchangers

and lots of glass? Why not heat it with steam, using a cast-iron radiator? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

The Tee would be a good place

@ April 29, 2003 9:15 AM in Radiator Traps

drill into the side of the tee and tap the hole. Or, you can undo the union and replace the 90-degree elbow on either side with a tee, then elbow up to the vent. What does the pipe do that comes out the top of the tee, then goes over, down and up again? Is that another branch of the dry return? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

CD, the reason you shouldn't use copper

@ April 28, 2003 4:04 PM in Steam and Copper Pipes

is because the soldered joints won't "give" as the pipe expands and contracts. And since copper expands more than steel, this is a big problem! This can break soldered joints loose, even if you use hard solder. Use black steel threaded pipe and have a pro install it, running a separate riser from the steam main to the second floor bath. You really will be glad you did. I agree that the kitchen radiator will probably be too big for the bathroom. But you should be able to find good used radiators somewhere near you. Do a heat-loss calculation on the rooms you want to add radiators to. This will tell you what size radiator to get, and also determine the pipe size of your new riser. To find a contractor who can handle this, go to the "Find a Contractor" page of this site and follow the instructions. If you're in the Baltimore area, e-mail me! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

You could find some radiators

@ April 28, 2003 10:05 AM in Radiator Traps

that would take up minimal wall space and wouldn't displace many cabinets. Do a heat-loss on both rooms and see how much heat you need (with insulated walls of course) and we can take it from there. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Main Vents

@ April 28, 2003 10:02 AM in Cleaning a steam system

A single Gorton #1 or Hoffman #75 at the end of each main should work nicely. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Addition Not Heated?

@ April 28, 2003 9:37 AM in Radiator Traps

Sounds like a candidate for another group of Vapor radiators with water seals! Now all we have to do is find some water seal units. T.P.Tunstall, are you listening? Think you could duplicate these things? If we can't find water seals, thermostatic traps will do. But I'd love to see the same thing on each radiator........ To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Good Question

@ April 28, 2003 9:19 AM in Radiator Traps

On the ones I've seen, the water seals were all the same. Do you know if your house was added to at some point? This might explain the different water seal units. Or, they might have changed the design of the seals and shipped some older ones and some newer ones in the same order. Are there any markings at all on the water seals or radiator shutoffs? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Those are water seals too

@ April 28, 2003 8:42 AM in Radiator Traps

and they work the same way as the other ones do. You're a lucky guy to have a system like this! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Mark, I agree

@ April 28, 2003 8:25 AM in Comments wanted (ME)

that potable water and heating-system water should never mix. I have never seen such a setup around here. I think it would be illegal in these parts since all Baltimore-area jurisdictions require backflow preventers on boiler feed lines. The reason? Potable water and heating-system water should never mix! Illegal or not, I will never install a system that mixes potable water with heating-system water. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Jamie, ME and Cheese are absolutely right

@ April 28, 2003 8:16 AM in Boiler Sizing Question!

You don't need a boiler any bigger than your heat-loss. However, I think you have an old gravity system here. It's way too easy to over-pump such a system, which will reduce efficiency. Size your circulator (system circ in a primary-secondary application) to the total EDR rating of the radiation, and you'll come close to mimicing the original design flow with gravity circulation. The system will actually heat faster this way- ask me how I know that! Go here- http://www.heatinghelp.com/newsletter.cfm?Id=125 for a handy chart and a more detailed description of how this works. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

That's a beautiful area

@ April 25, 2003 10:18 PM in Books on Hydronic Heating

I drove thru that area last year, stayed overnight in Warren and explored the National Forest area the next day. Lucky you! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Best thing you can do

@ April 25, 2003 9:06 PM in one pipe steam radiators

if you haven't done so already, is read "The Lost Art of Steam Heating". Everything you need when re-piping anything on that system is in there. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Scrape the worst off

@ April 25, 2003 5:03 PM in Steam Questions

and use a good chemical stripper for the rest. Using heat doesn't work too well on cast-iron. If you have a steam system, the radiators should be fairly easy to disconnect without draining the system. A hot-water system would need to be drained before disconnecting anything. That paint is probably leaded, so take appropriate precautions. When you repaint, use paint that can handle the heat without peeling. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

If you're starting from scratch

@ April 25, 2003 4:55 PM in one pipe steam radiators

and installing used radiators, I'd hose them out as best I could. But if you're just replacing the boiler, I'd leave them alone unless they're so full of gunk that the water can't return. It's also a good idea to flush or replace the wet returns on a boiler replacement. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

And

@ April 25, 2003 4:49 PM in Having a air problem with a loop system.

Pump Away from the air separator and expansion tank connection. This will flush air back to the separator, and you'll never have this problem again! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Keystokers

@ April 25, 2003 4:48 PM in Books on Hydronic Heating

I dont think these boilers are ASME approved, so your local Code authority may not permit them. Too bad- I liked the one I saw a while ago on a steam system in Pennsylvania. I've had good luck with Slant/Fin's program. But be sure you have the right inside and outside design temperatures. That said, it's not uncommon to find oversized furnasties and boilers. I think you have an interesting project there, Wally. Where are you located? I'm sure there's someone near you who can handle it. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

A short nipple

@ April 24, 2003 5:22 PM in Radiator Traps

up to about 4-inches long or so should be fine. Drill and tap the opening so the nipple pitches up from the return pipe slightly. Then screw an elbow on the nipple, install your vent and you're ready. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

The steam boiler

@ April 24, 2003 5:20 PM in Drawbacks of running baseboard hot water zone off steam boiler

could either be upgraded with a newer burner (if not already done) or replaced. But taking the baseboards and hot faucet water off of it will make it run less, and the burner could be re-tuned so it only provides enough heat for your one-pipe convectors. It might make sense to re-tune it now, and replace it later when it's convenient. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

If you do this yourself

@ April 24, 2003 5:12 PM in Radiator Traps

get a 1/2-inch pipe thread tap and tap a separate hole for each #2 you install. You may not have room to tap into the top of the pipe or fitting, but tapping into the side is OK in this case. If you tap the side, provide an upward pitch from the return line so any water that gets in there can drain out. Let us know how you make out! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

You'd have to trace them out

@ April 24, 2003 5:05 PM in Radiator Traps

but I'll bet the steam main splits in two at some point, and those little pipes with vents on them are there to drain start-up condensate from the mains after they split. The reason for the vents themselves is obvious- you need to clear all the air from the steam mains in about a minute so all radiators get steam at about the same time. Also, you need to insulate those steam pipes. You're losing a lot of heat there, and it all goes up the chimney when the burner runs. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Not right now

@ April 24, 2003 5:02 PM in Radiator Traps

Make sure the dry return is properly vented, then try the system again. I'll bet you see a big difference by fixing the venting! If you still have problems, then you can clean out the return fittings. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"