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Steamhead

Steamhead

Joined on March 11, 2004

Last Post on July 31, 2014

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It may be possible

@ February 27, 2003 5:44 PM in New Steam Boiler, but one size bigger than ordered!

to down-fire that SGO-4 to more closely match the radiation. But that still doesn't alter the fact that they didn't put in the specified boiler. I'd like to see a pic of the installation too. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

I'm sure they'll call you back

@ February 27, 2003 5:40 PM in co

with their tail between their legs, after Mr. Cheapenfast botches the job. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

An ordinary radiator trap

@ February 26, 2003 8:15 PM in Traps and Broomell System

like the Hoffman #17C will work fine. On a larger radiator use the Barnes & Jones #122 since it vents air more quickly. Your radiators should not have vents on them. The air should vent into the dry return and out thru the receiver/regulator (if it's still there) or a large vent mounted on the return. I've seen installations where a separate dry return was installed to service a group of new radiators, but they forgot to put a vent on it. The solution here is obvious! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

It Depends

@ February 26, 2003 7:54 PM in steam boiler replacement?

If your old boiler is a round "snowman" type that used to burn coal (see photo), I'd replace it now. This type of boiler is horribly inefficient. If your boiler is of a newer type, it might not make sense to replace it now. How about taking a picture and posting it here so we can see it? If the system is sluggish or uneven, the boiler is probably not at fault. You may have bad traps or vents that need attention. This may be a Vapor system- have you observed any manufacturer's information on the system's components? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

That's probably all the pressure you need

@ February 26, 2003 7:47 PM in vapor system won't build more than 2 oz.; okay?

if all the rooms are heating up evenly, you don't need any more. If the main receiver/regulator unit near the boiler is gone (see "The Lost Art of Steam Heating", chapter 15, for a photo) you need vents on the ends of the dry returns to discharge the air from the radiators. You also need vents near the ends of the steam mains so the mains will fill with steam quickly. To size vents for steam mains, measure the length and diameter of the mains and post the info here. We can tell you what you will need. You might want to get Dan's "Dead Men's Steam School" video and workbook. This lets you listen to Dan telling all about how steam systems were designed and installed! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Follow these links

@ February 26, 2003 7:38 PM in Radiator protection

if you're gonna use covers, here's how to do it right, so they won't restrict the radiator's output and waste fuel. http://www.heatinghelp.com/newsletter.cfm?Id=77 http://www.heatinghelp.com/newsletter.cfm?Id=115 To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Too late to save Enron

@ February 25, 2003 7:55 PM in Gas Prices

saw regular at $1.71.9 in Cockeysville today (north of Baltimore) and hi-test was $1.87.9. Two days ago I got a tankful of regular at $1.63.9. And they say prices will keep going up............ To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

That's a great system

@ February 25, 2003 7:47 PM in 1887 two pipe steam without traps?

very few moving parts, and it runs on seven ounces or so. Get Dan's books "The Lost Art of Steam Heating" and "The Lost Art of Steam Heating Companion". This type of system appears in both books. Order them on the Books and More page of thi site. In the basement, you may find a cylindrical receiver/regulator unit near the boiler, and a radiator mounted on the ceiling. This radiator was installed to condense any vapor that passed the receiver/regulator. The pipe leading out of this condensing radiator led into the chimney flue. They used the chimney draft to pull steam thru this system! With proper care, this system will last many more years. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Amen, Keith

@ February 24, 2003 12:17 PM in CO

couldn't have said it better myself. George, try the Find a Contractor page of this site to locate someone who can do a meaningful CO test. You may be surprised at what we find. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Nice Job, GasMan

@ February 24, 2003 12:15 PM in CO

and it proves once again, the only real test is that done under conditions of actual use. Bet you had some serious impingement on that old coffee pot! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

You can find the Murrays

@ February 24, 2003 12:06 PM in real old radiator

on pages 133-135 of Dan's book "E.D.R.". Order your copy on the Books and More page of this site. I'm not sure of the other one. Is there a name on it anywhere? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

That return line

@ February 24, 2003 12:02 PM in steam return pipe hammering frequently

may have gotten plugged up, which would cause water to back up into the steam main. Then the steam hits the water, and BANG! If you find it's plugged, I'd replace it. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

I believe those were standard column units

@ February 23, 2003 10:12 PM in real old radiator

the chart for American Peerless radiators should be pretty close. What kind of system is it on? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

You might want to check out

@ February 23, 2003 1:11 AM in dead men

Advanced Book Exchange, www.abebooks.com or Barnes and Noble, www.BN.com and click on the Out of Print tab. Both give you searchable access to book dealers all over the USA, Canada and other places. And both have plenty of old heating books! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

OK, but there's

@ February 23, 2003 12:40 AM in Heat pump to produce HOT water?

still the problem of contamination. I'd still rearrange it. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Charlie, A Better Arrangement

@ February 22, 2003 11:29 PM in Heat pump to produce HOT water?

would be to have the boiler water heating the domestic hot water in the tank via the heat exchanger, and a reset controller operating a primary-secondary pumping setup or mixing valve that can vary the water temp in your radiant floors. This way you don't have fresh water running thru the boiler all the time, which can shorten its life and add impurities to your faucet water. Variations of this type of system have also resulted in bacterial contamination. I'd change this right away; your family's health is at stake. I've heard of heat pumps that can route their reject-heat into hot water tanks, but am not that familiar with them. Maybe another Wethead (see our Find a Contractor page) or someone from Trane, Carrier or another heat-pump company could help you there. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Another Beautiful Job, Dave

@ February 22, 2003 11:18 PM in I'm a little Munchkin, short & stout.....

and knowing you, it works as well as it looks! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Tim's books

@ February 22, 2003 10:55 PM in Power Gas Burners

are as highly recommended as Dan's. Very well written, lots of information and easy to understand. Get his catalog and order yours now! I know this sounds like a late-night TV commercial, but Tim's books really are that good. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Believe it or not

@ February 22, 2003 8:09 PM in Steam vent question

it contained just under 3 cubic feet of air. The Gorton #2 will vent about 5 Cu. Ft. per minute at 2 ounces pressure. So it has plenty of capacity. You could use several Hoffman #75 vents to do the same thing. But since a single Gorton #2 costs about the same as a Hoffman #75, the choice is obvious. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Perhaps just as important, Mike

@ February 22, 2003 7:59 PM in Need to replace my WM MGB-6 (cracked casting)

is trying to ascertain why it cracked. Was the low-water cutoff working? Was the piping around the boiler done according to W-M's specs? Was the boiler sized properly to the building's radiation? Was the boiler firing at the proper rate? Are all the system's air vents properly sized and working? Are the return lines flowing freely? Is the pressure set no higher than the system was designed for? Is the water feed line piped into the wet return, so cold water will not shock the boiler? Any time I assess a system with a cracked boiler, I look for things that could cause the crack. Often I find more than one of the above. I recently looked at a Hoffman Vapor system with a Columbia boiler that had cracked for the second time. The first time someone replaced the bad section and hoped for the best. This time it gets done right! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Dan came up with something similar

@ February 22, 2003 7:48 PM in dead men

"A hundred years from now, they will gaze upon my work and marvel at my skills, but never know my name. And that will be good enough for me." To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

What

@ February 21, 2003 7:25 PM in Boiler Return Trap

are the symptoms, Wayne? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"