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Steamhead

Steamhead

Joined on March 11, 2004

Last Post on July 31, 2014

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Thanks Alan

@ December 14, 2002 8:13 PM in Hey Steamhead?

I think it would make a great addition to the Oil Tech Talk site. BTW, if e-mail bounces again keep trying- just checked and a couple messages did get thru this afternoon. Maybe Verizon was having server problems? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Why is the pressure

@ December 14, 2002 2:49 PM in steam

dropping so much during the Cycleguard tripping? Are the pipes insulated? Are any vents leaking? Do the radiator shutoff valve stems need repacking? All of these can contribute to rapid pressure drop on shutdown. Sounds like the Cycleguard is OK and the problem is in the system somewhere. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

What kind of system

@ December 14, 2002 2:38 PM in Flow of hot water (faster vs slower)

are we talking about here, Mike? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Glenn and the Burnham Boys could answer this best

@ December 14, 2002 2:30 PM in Burnham boiler - oil fired smokey

but I remember hearing that you shouldn't down-fire by more than 25%. For what it's worth, my V-14 is running .75 GPH with no apparent ill effects. Down-firing 25% from 1.35 works out to 1.01 GPH. So, by the above rule, a 1 GPH, 60-degree, solid-cone nozzle would probably work OK. But why not do a heat-loss on the building to see just how much you need? Then you can fire to the load. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Between Lima and Findlay, right?

@ December 14, 2002 2:20 PM in Homeowner help, 2-pipe steam system, circa 1914

I passed thru that area on my way to Michigan a couple months back! If I'd only known.......... To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Vacuum vents

@ December 14, 2002 2:11 PM in Trane system upgrades - results

really only work well with coal firing. With oil or gas, the burner can shut down on thermostat before all the air is out. When the system then drops into vacuum, this air will expand and may block steam circulation. The Gorton #2 vent has 4 times the capacity of the old Trane vent, so it will vent much more quickly. Since it is not a vacuum vent, you won't have trouble with expanded air blocking the steam flow. Mark, does your system still have its Direct Return Trap (looks like an old metal milk jug)? If so, you can probably get away with just cranking the Pressuretrol all the way down. The Return Trap, if working properly, will see that the water can return to the boiler. If the Return Trap is gone, you need to use a Vaporstat. Get the one that only goes up to 1 PSI. This will keep the boiler pressure low enough (8-10 ounces or so)that the water can return without help. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Glenn, were the V1/ABC specs revised

@ December 13, 2002 9:48 PM in Burnham boiler - oil fired smokey

after my boiler was made and the manuals (see above posts) printed? If so, I wouldn't mind getting the latest ones as well. TIA To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

No Problem, Jim

@ December 13, 2002 9:43 PM in Burnham boiler - oil fired smokey

that's why we're here! Let us know how you do. BTW- to those of you who recommended replacing the burner- if that had not been a flame-retention burner I would have agreed with you. While I'm definitely into old systems, I don't believe a poorly operating non-flame-retention burner is worth keeping. Though I do have an old Toridheet sitting in my garage...... To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Depends

@ December 13, 2002 9:14 PM in Trane system upgrades - results

on whether you have household recycling in your area. Yes, I couldn't resist doing something unusual with a familiar term..... To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

I know the town

@ December 13, 2002 7:17 PM in More Trane

beautiful old University town. For a while, much heating research was done at U of I's Research Residence. Try getting in touch with Dave "Boilerpro" Bunnell. He's up in Amboy, but he knows steam. You can e-mail him at boilerpros@cin.net . To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

I see a few older Thrush circulators

@ December 13, 2002 7:04 PM in Opinions on Thrush

in the Baltimore area, but parts have been difficult to find. A lot of the ones on converted gravity systems were oversized anyway so I generally put in properly-sized units. I do have a couple of o-l-d vertical Thrushes sitting in my basement though- one has 1-1/2" unions instead of flanges. Speaking of which- I have the B&G and Taco procedures for sizing circs on gravity conversions (which didn't always get followed), dating to the 1940s. Haven't been able to find Thrush's method yet- would you happen to have it on some dusty bookshelf? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

But

@ December 13, 2002 6:28 PM in Burnham boiler - oil fired smokey

if a new 60-degree nozzle makes it burn properly, why replace the entire burner? As far as parts go, R. E. Michel (fine old Baltimore-based company) still stocks parts for the FC Bantam, as well as many burners that are even older. I haven't had to worry about getting parts at all. I think Enerjet bought out ABC, and may still have parts available also. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Exactly

@ December 13, 2002 5:43 PM in Trane system upgrades - results

that #76 has given up the ghost. R.I.P. (Recycle it Please) To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

It's Hard to Stop all these Tranes

@ December 13, 2002 5:28 PM in Homeowner help, 2-pipe steam system, circa 1914

from coming out of the woodwork! Where are you and this grand old system located? Bad traps can cause banging, but so can a few other things. If the banging is in the dry (overhead) return, it's probably due to bad traps. Feel the return- it should be cool or warm, but not steam-hot. If you find it is steam-hot, try to find which radiator return the steam is coming from. That's probably the one with the bad trap. If the traps have never been maintained, it makes sense to put new innards in all of them. You can get them from Tunstall or Barnes and Jones- both make good equipment. The "Pop-up" is actually an air vent. These, like traps, eventually wear out. I like to use Gorton #2 vents on Vapor systems, they have 4 times the capacity of the original Trane vents which works great now that we're no longer burning coal. The Trane Vapor system is covered in Dan's book "The Lost Art of Steam Heating Companion". Steam heating in general is covered in "The Lost Art of Steam Heating". Both are available on the Books and More page of this site. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Many old vacuum systems

@ December 13, 2002 2:51 PM in vacum steam systems

were actually Vapor systems that could run below atmospheric pressure on mild days. These are some of the best systems out there. Try to find some manufacurer's names or take some pictures and post them. We can help you identify the systems this way. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Jake's right

@ December 13, 2002 2:46 PM in F&T Float 'Impoded?'

change the seats on those 30-pound traps to 15-pounders when you rebuild them and you should be OK. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Very simple

@ December 13, 2002 2:43 PM in Trane system upgrades - results

A standard vent (radiator or main) lets air out and closes on temperature. When the system cools down, the vent opens and air van re-ente rthe system. A Vacuum vent will not re-open and let air into the system when cool. It will only re-open when there is air to be expelled again. The problem with vacuum vents on oil or gas fired systems is the system often goes into vacuum before all the air is out. The air can then expand and block steam flow. This is why I recommend the Gorton #2. It will vent quickly on an ounce or two of vapor, but not permit expanded air to block steam flow. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

More ABC info

@ December 13, 2002 2:21 PM in Burnham boiler - oil fired smokey

Here is the corresponding info from the boiler installation manual. This is how the burners were set up from the Burnham factory. The burner in the V-15 used a 60-degree nozzle, not a 70 or 80 degree. Earlier V1s could also be had with Wayne MS-R burners. Later model V1 series boilers had Becketts. I don't have the Burnham OEM info on Beckett-equipped V1s, but I'm sure Glenn Stanton does. If you end up changing that burner, get the specs from Burnham and you can't go wrong. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

ABC-Sunray FC Bantam IS a flame-retention burner

@ December 13, 2002 2:15 PM in Burnham boiler - oil fired smokey

I have a V-14 with that burner and it still burns nicely! But you have to set it up correctly and the procedure is different from the more-common Beckett units. In particular, if the cup is too far forward relative to the nozzle you'll get oil impingement and a poor flame. Here is the setup page of the instruction sheet that came with the burner. Some of the type is rather small so I have posted it full-size. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

It's Hard to Stop a Trane

@ December 12, 2002 6:47 PM in More Trane

You need the "standard" gauge to satisfy Code requirements, which call for a gauge that can read twice the blow-off pressure of the safety valve. If the pressure in your system gets higher than about 10 ounces or so, the water won't return to the boiler by itself. That's what the Return Trap is for. But if you have a Vaporstat, it can be set to stop the burner before the Return Trap would be activated. In this scenario, the Return Trap becomes a backup device. We seem to be finding a lot of Tranes lately. Where are you and your system located? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

You'll get better distribution

@ December 12, 2002 6:39 PM in Trane system upgrades - results

with the Gortons. The Hoffman #76 is a vacuum vent, which is not desirable when firing that system with oil or gas. If the system goes into vacuum before all the air is out, the remaining air will expand and possibly block incoming steam. Vacuum vents were only effective when burning coal. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Maintaining Oil Equipment

@ December 11, 2002 3:57 PM in Real HO with Leaking Oil Tank

is actually a plus, since you get a (hopefully) pro coming into the basement every year to clean and tune the system, and who will be in a position to prevent major disasters via preventive maintenance. If I were going to be away for an extended time as you will be, I would find that comforting. Take a look at the Burnham Opus oil-fired boiler. It has an 87% AFUE, built-in reset controls and more, and it's designed around a Beckett burner for which parts are readily available almost anywhere. Go to www.aboutopus.com for further information. Burnham also makes an Opus for gas. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"