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Steamhead

Steamhead

Joined on March 11, 2004

Last Post on September 16, 2014

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Go back and take some pictures

@ July 17, 2002 6:47 PM in Have you ever seen...

I've read of combination warm air/hot water systems, but nothing like this. Maybe the Carrier people have something on it. Just proves the old saying that you've NEVER seen it all! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Rodney, this sounds very different

@ July 17, 2002 6:35 PM in Need HELP for school project

from the systems we use in the States. From your description, it sounds like the hot-water tank is placed at the top of the building and feeds the system by gravity. I recall reading that gravity-feed tanks were used in isolated water-supply systems (as on farms) years ago, before pressurized tanks became practical. But I've never heard of a separate gravity-feed tank for hot water. Can you be more specific as to how this system works, in particular how the hot water is generated (heat exchanger, coil in tank or whatever) and the type of building the system supplies? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

That has to be OLD

@ July 17, 2002 6:21 PM in Radiator foot warmer

to have a manual air vent on a steam radiator. This setup was common before the days of reliable automatic air vents. The first really good automatic vent was the Hoffman #1, which came out in 1912. I still see some manual vents out there occasionally- usually on a third- or fourth-floor rad in a room that was used rarely if at all. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Doug, how many

@ July 16, 2002 8:09 PM in Hard to find steam radiator size

btus/hour are needed in this room, and where is this project located? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Dale and Big Ed, that's the 2-pipe, air-vent system

@ July 16, 2002 7:50 PM in 2-pipe steam

with a vent on each radiator, and a return line from each radiator that carries only condensate (no air) into a wet return. This system almost always has a radiator shutoff valve on the return as well as the supply. These systems were rather difficult to control, which led to the development of Vapor systems. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Check

@ July 16, 2002 7:45 PM in 2-pipe steam

inside the return-end bushing, where the tailpiece for the return ell screws into it. If you can see thru to the inside of the radiator, then you probably have an orifice system. If not, the bushing probably contains a water seal. If it's a water-seal system, you can use ordinary radiator traps on the new radiators. If it's an orifice system, you'll have to provide an orifice at the inlet. Here's a cutaway of a radiator with a water-seal bushing in it. Ignore the fact that most of the rad is filled with water- that's irrelevant here. Look at the return connection at the lower left- you'll see how the bushing traps some water to keep steam from getting thru to the dry return. You'll also see the air hole. Where is this system located? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

That's definitely Vapor

@ July 15, 2002 7:32 PM in 2-pipe steam

and there were several different ways to do what a steam trap does now- allow air and condensate to pass from the radiator into the dry return, but not let steam get thru. 1- Water seals- just like a sink trap, these things contained some water so steam could not get thru. Sometimes these were contained in the radiator return-end bushing, other times in the return elbow. A small hole was drilled above the water level so air could vent through to the dry return, but it wouldn't let enough steam thru to cause trouble. 2- Weighted check valves- these were almost always mounted in the return elbow. 3- Orificed inlets- These depended on very low pressure, usually 8 ounces or so (always use a Vaporstat on these systems). The orifice, located either as part of the shutoff valve or as a separate disk or plate, allowed in only enough steam to enter the rad as that rad could condense. We love this old stuff. Take some pics of it and post them- including any scary-looking hardware you may find in the boiler room- and let us know if you found any brand names. We'll do our best to help you identify that system. Vapor systems were top-of-the-line in their day, and are still some of the quickest, quietest and most-efficient systems out there. Fixing them is easy once you know how they work. If you haven't done so already, get Dan's books "The Lost Art of Steam Heating" and "The Lost Art of Steam Heating Companion". Both cover Vapor systems quite well. Order them on the Books and More page of this site. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

The Column radiator is a Rococo

@ July 14, 2002 7:07 AM in Historic Renovation P2-Paul Pollets

the other two are Verona Flue radiators I believe. All are Gorgeous! Thanks for saving another houseful of these beauties. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Looks Good to me

@ July 10, 2002 5:51 PM in She's Steaming - Alan(CaliforniaRadiant)Forbes

the only other thing I'd do is insulate the steam pipes. This will make the heat come up much fater and save a lot of fuel. You want the steam to condense and give off its heat in the radiators, not the pipes. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

I think you'll do fine,Luke

@ July 8, 2002 3:07 PM in Steamhead- can you help me with a print? Luke Lefever

but I'll be glad to look at it. We're moving the office so the fax isn't hooked up, but you could scan & e-mail it to me. If the ptint is too big for one scan, break it up as needed and send the pieces. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

You're doing fine

@ July 5, 2002 7:02 AM in Maidenhead steam (CaliforniaRadiant)

The header is critical, though..... read and follow the piping diagrams in the manual and you won't go wrong. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Follow This Link

@ July 4, 2002 8:16 PM in Apologies - J.C.A.

to download Netscape 6.2. Install it and go! I think it can import your Internet Explorer Favorites and address books too. http://wp.netscape.com/computing/download/index.html To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

@ July 4, 2002 8:15 PM in Apologies - J.C.A.

To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

I know I've said this before

@ July 4, 2002 7:41 AM in Apologies - J.C.A.

but if we stop using Microsoft Internet Explorer and Outlook Express, we wont transmit as many viruses as most of these nasty things are Microsoft-only. This is why I use the FREE Netscape 6.2 browser and e-mail client. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Was that

@ July 4, 2002 7:24 AM in Hot at Work? - Noel

the store with the two-way mirror? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Not illegal, but not a good idea

@ July 4, 2002 7:16 AM in Copper Piping in One Pipe Steam Systems - Jim Greco

Copper expands more than steel when heated, and the soldered joints won't "give" like threaded joints will. So using copper for steam-carrying pipes is a bad idea. It's fine for wet (below waterline) returns though. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Ask Mad Dog

@ July 2, 2002 1:43 PM in Long Island Source, Plumbing Recycler? - Patchogue Phil

he showed me one such place- I think the name is Christ's, but that might not be correct. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

On the lighter side

@ July 2, 2002 7:28 AM in Drought Management...(ME)

here's my favorite drought slogan, which has been around since the 1970's at least: "Save water- shower with a friend". To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Radiator Steam (and Air) Capacities

@ July 1, 2002 11:05 PM in And now, back to Steam Heat - S. Milne

from Dan's Dead Men's Steam School Workbook (comes with the video) which every Wallhead should have: Small-tube- .009 cubic feet per square foot EDR; Large-tube- .013; Column- .025; Wall- .028; Flue- .029 (the real real old ones like those I swapped to Mad Dog). For the record, I've never had to add a boiler-feed pump yet- even with big old column or flue rads. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Just say when

@ July 1, 2002 10:53 PM in The whereabouts of Mad Dog - Mad Dog

and I'll be there! To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

It could work that way

@ June 30, 2002 7:14 AM in And now, back to Steam Heat - S. Milne

and yes, I think you'd need an equalizer to (1) get the air out of the tank on fill-up and (2) allow the level in the tank to drop when needed. I haven't done it like this though- anyone out there ever use a setup like this? To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"

Jammer's idea

@ June 30, 2002 7:10 AM in And now, back to Steam Heat - S. Milne

is pretty slick! I'll have to remember that one. To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"